School of law

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ's)

  1. Who is eligible to register a team in the Moot?
  2. Who is eligible to be a member of a team?
  3. What must be done for a team to register?
  4. What is the total cost for a team to participate in the Moot?
  5. How many team members should there be?
  6. How long should a team plan to stay for the competition?
  7. Should a professor or coach accompany the team for the oral arguments?
  8. Are the memoranda of the winners of past Moots, which are posted on the web site, a good guide to the style in which a memorandum should be written?
  9. How should the arbitrators be addressed?
  10. Do the participants stand or sit when presenting their arguments?
  11. Do the arbitrators permit or expect the students to present their arguments without interruption or do they ask questions during the argument?
  12. What is the best preparation for the oral arguments?
  13. Must the teams have already studied maritime law to enter the competition?

Who is eligible to register a team in the Moot? 

Every law school is eligible. Schools that are not law schools are normally also eligible if the study of law is part of the program.

Who is eligible to be a member of a team?

Team members must be registered students at their university as at the end of December. See the Rules for the precise date. Students working for a masters or doctor degree are also eligible, unless they have been admitted to the practice of law. In case of doubt as to the eligibility of a student, the Moot Director should be consulted.

What must be done for a team to register?

There are three steps for a registration to be definitive:

  1. Submission of a registration form duly completed;
  2. Payment of the registration fee of A$750;
  3. submission of the memoranda by the due date 

What is the total cost for a team to participate in the Moot?

The total cost for a team to participate depends on a number of factors that are not the same for all teams. The one element of cost that is the same for all teams is the registration fee of A$750.

There are administrative costs such as reproduction of 3 copies of the memoranda and sending those to Perth.

The other items of expense vary depending on such factors as the number of team members, the cost of travel to the place of competition, the level of accommodation and of food that are expected. A list of available hotels and/or student accommodation will be posted on the web site to enable teams to prepare a budget.

How many team members should there be?

The rules require that there be two members of every team in each of the oral arguments. Therefore, there must be a minimum of two team members. There is an upper limit of 6 team members.

How long should a team plan to stay for the competition?

Teams should arrive in time for the welcome & briefing which is held the day before the commencement of general rounds. The competition is completed at the end of the awards function.

Should a professor or coach accompany the team for the oral arguments?

Between half and two-thirds of the teams are accompanied by a professor or coach. It may be helpful to the team to have an opportunity for discussion of their performance while it is still fresh. What is clear is that professors and coaches who attend the oral arguments become more involved in the Moot and give clearer guidance to future teams. Many of the professors and coaches also participate as arbitrators and thereby have a better opportunity to share experiences with the other arbitrators.

Are the memoranda of the winners of past Moots, which are posted on the web site, a good guide to the style in which a memorandum should be written?

Yes.

How should the arbitrators be addressed?

Arbitrators in the Moot and in real arbitrations are normally lawyers and law professors and they should be addressed as one would address such persons.

Do the participants stand or sit when presenting their arguments?

Everyone is seated. The student participants and the arbitrators are seated at tables arranged

in a U formation with the arbitrators in the middle, and the advocates on the two sides.

Do the arbitrators permit or expect the students to present their arguments without interruption or do they ask questions during the argument?

Arbitrators who come from different legal systems tend to have different expectations. Those who come from a civil law background tend to ask fewer questions and to ask those questions at the end of a presentation by the advocate. Those who come from a common law background tend to ask questions from the beginning and sometimes do not allow the advocate to make a systematic argument at all.

What is the best preparation for the oral arguments?

Obviously it is necessary to start with knowing thoroughly the facts of the Problem, the legal issues and the arguments in favour of the claimant or the respondent, as the case may be. There should be practice arguments in front of arbitrators who know the Problem. Those arguments may be within the team or against other teams, if it is feasible to do so. The team should write down every question it or the opposition are asked by arbitrators, both in practice moots and during competition, and then brainstorm the best possible answer to that question in preparation for the next moot. There will be some guidance from past arbitrators posted on youtube for competitors to watch. Search for IMLAM2013.

Must the teams have already studied maritime law to enter the competition?

No. in fact, in the past teams who have had no prior knowledge of maritime law have still done extremely well in the competition.