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On the right path - Murdoch welcomes students to National Indigenous Business Summer School

Last week Murdoch University welcomed 24 young Aboriginal people from across Western Australia to campus to explore opportunities in business and commerce at the National Indigenous Business Summer School WA.

Last week Murdoch University welcomed 24 young Aboriginal people from across Western Australia to campus to explore opportunities in business and commerce at the National Indigenous Business Summer School WA. 

For four days, the students from years 9 to 11 spent time with business academics and mentors from Murdoch and our partner host universities Curtin, UWA, Notre Dame and ECU, who helped the students see how their study choices can have a positive impact on their future. 

With the theme ‘Katitjiny Boya Birrit’, meaning ‘pathway to understanding business’ interpreted in Noongar, the summer school was organised with the support of the Australian Business Deans Council, and provided students with an immersive experience and taste of university life in a supportive environment.  

From workshops and business plans, to meeting successful Aboriginal entrepreneurs and getting to know other students, the program gave participants a glimpse into what studying business could be like. 

Based at the Murdoch Student Village, the aspiring entrepreneurs and managers participated in a full academic program as well as enjoying social activities which included an inspirational breakfast with Aboriginal business mentors, quiz night with business school staff, and a river cruise. 

A group of six female Aboriginal high school students participate in a discussion with a middle-aged, white, male university academic.
Manager of Murdoch’s Kulbardi Aboriginal Centre and proud Noongar woman and business owner, Sharna Ninyette, said the summer school was about opening doors for young Aboriginal people to understand the many benefits of studying business at university. 

“It’s not just about getting more Aboriginal people to start businesses, but about encouraging Aboriginal leadership in the community,” she said. 

“Business skills are useful and transferrable, and we want to see more Aboriginal people in the community with those skills.” 

Posted on:

24 Jan 2022

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