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CAVE Clinical Skills Week

Jurox

Anaesthesia and Emergency and Critical Care

Tuesday 7th February 2017

Anaesthesia - the building blocks for successful anaesthetic (6CPD Points)

Anaesthesia can be a stressful situation at times, with many things to consider. This session will provide you with up-to-date knowledge that will allow you to establish a good basis for all your anaesthetics through tips and tricks to help improve the peri-anaesthetic management of all your patients, benefit the animal, you the veterinarian, and the veterinary hospital as a whole.

Detailed program outlined further below

Emergency and Critical Care - procedures laboratory (5CPD Points)

Emergency and critical care patients are often unstable and require the clinician to perform invasive diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in a timely fashion to optimize their care. This laboratory utilising cadavers will provide hands-on opportunities to learn over a dozen emergency and critical care procedures as well as techniques for obtaining samples of various body fluids for diagnostic purposes.

Detailed program outlined further below.

Registration

Download and complete the CAVE Clinical Skills Week Registration Form and return to the CAVE Office to secure your place.  Forms can be submitted via fax to +61 8 9360 7283, scanned and emailed* to cave@murdoch.edu.au or posted to the CAVE Office, 90 South St, Vet Surgical Centre, Murdoch University, Western Australia 6150.

*Emailing credit card details is unsafe and not recommended.  We are happy to call you to process payment if you would like to submit your registration form via email.

Outline for the day ...

Anaesthesia - the building blocks for successful Anaesthetic

Anaesthesia can be a stressful situation at times, with many things to consider. This session will provide you with up-to-date knowledge that will allow you to establish a good basis for all your anaesthetics through tips and tricks to help improve the peri-anaesthetic management of all your patients, benefit the animal, you the veterinarian, and the veterinary hospital as a whole.

Reduce your anaesthetic mortality and morbidity!

Gain insight into the latest scientific findings on the causes of anaesthesia related morbidity and mortality in small animal practice. Most fi suggest that it is primarily peri-anaesthetic management, which increases or decreases the risk for small animal patients. This seminar will explore easy ways to avoid this situation in everyday anaesthetic routines.

Practical approaches to analgesia

Analgesia has come a long way and is still an area of active improvement, with new drugs and modalities to treat pain appearing in literature regularly. It can be difficult to keep up with all of the new fi and the pro’s and con’s in every species. This seminar will discuss and explore what can be done to improve daily practice routines to treat pain in patients adequately and fulfil the expectations of the owners. 

Circuits – Is your animal breathing properly? (PRACTICAL)

This ‘hands on’ practical back-to basics session will give you the opportunity to rethink your daily practice: Which circuit to choose and when? How to set up the circuit? How to make sure there are no leaks in the circuit? How to trouble-shoot a leak in the system? Beside answers to these questions, you will also find ways to save money with choosing the best flow rates for each circuit and reduce your impact on the environment. 

Dental nerve blocks: the why and how to (WET LAB)

In this wet-lab you will have the opportunity to feel the landmarks and complete dental blocks in cadavers under the guidance of experts. It has been revealed that dental procedures carry the same risk for the animal to die as major surgery and one main factor is inadequate analgesia. Dental blocks are very easy, quick and cheap to perform. So use this opportunity to learn which block should be done and when!

Anaesthesia Presenters

Dr Anthea Raisis 

BVSc (1st Hons), MVetClinStud, DVetSci, DipECVAA

Dr Anthea Raisis  Dr Martina Mosing 

Dr.med.vet, DipECVAA

Dr Martina Mosing 
Dr Ellie Drynan 

BVSc, DipECVAA

Dr Ellie Drynan  Dr Griet Haitjema 

BSc, BVMS, DipECVAA

Dr Griet Haitjema 

Emergency and Critical Care - Procedures Laboratory

Emergency and critical care patients are often unstable and require the clinician to perform invasive diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in a timely fashion to optimize their care. This laboratory utilising cadavers will provide hands-on opportunities to learn over a dozen emergency and critical care procedures as well as techniques for obtaining samples of various body fluids for diagnostic purposes.

Nasal oxygen, tracheostomy and external feeding tubes (nasal and oesophageal)

The first ECC session will start at the nose of the dog and work backwards. Firstly we will discuss the placement of nasal oxygen catheters, and how this technique is adapted to pass feeding tubes into the oesophagus and/or stomach. The placement of oesophageal feeding tubes to allow provision of medium-term enteral nutrition will also be covered and finally the technique for an emergency temporary tracheostomy will be reviewed with opportunities to practice. 

Venous access techniques and urinary catheters

Next we will shift our focus to methods to obtain access to the circulatory system. We will start with a peripheral venous cut- down, a technique that can be extremely useful to obtain venous access in a collapsed patient. Subsequently we will transition to the placement of central venous catheters, teaching both the approach to cut-down to the jugular vein, and the modified Seldinger technique to place central catheters. This session will also cover the methods to obtain intraosseous access for fluid drug administration and the placement of foley urinary catheters. 

Thoracic procedures

This session will cover thoracostomy tube placement, including the placement of both large trocar type tubes, and smaller bore tubes (Mila chest tubes) using a Seldinger technique. Additionally the procedure for open chest CPR will be taught. 

Sampling body fluids

The final session will review the procedures for collection of body fluids, including CSF, joint fluid and lower airway fluid. CSF taps will include both the cisterna magna and lumbar sites. Arthrocentesis will also be reviewed including techniques for the stifle, carpus and tarsus. A technique for blind bronchoalveolar lavage will also be reviewed. 

Emergency and Critical Care Presenters

Dr Sarah Purcell 

BSc, BVMS (Hons), MANZCVS, DACVECC

Dr Sarah Purcell 

Dr Claire Sharp 

BSc, BVMS (Hons), MS, MANZCVS, DACVECC

Dr Claire Sharp 

Dr. Melissa Claus 

DVM, Dip ACVECC

Dr. Melissa Claus     

Contact

If you have any queries, please do not hesitate to contact CAVE on +61 (08) 9360 6342 or email cave@murdoch.edu.au