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Immunotherapy Research Group

Our immune system has evolved to provide defence against harmful infectious agents and other antigens. However, an inflammatory response must be regulated to avoid unwanted side effects of tissue damage, which may lead to autoimmunity like myocarditis and allergies such as allergic asthma.

The immunotherapy research group was established at Murdoch University in 1999 with the appointment of Professor Cassandra Berry in the Biomedical Science programme. Her initial interests in interferons, the first cytokines to be commercialised for therapy has expanded to include infectious diseases like herpes, influenza and HIV.

Other members of the group investigate acute and chronic inflammatory disorders, asthma and allergic airways inflammation exploring the link between virus infection and chronic inflammation.  The team strives to be a vibrant and strong group with a collegial culture that captures opportunities broadly to enhance both basic research activities and clinical applications of immunotherapeutics, harnessing the power of our natural immune systems to fight disease and improve quality of life.

Research focus resides in preclinical studies of the application of interferon subtypes and other cytokines, antibodies, dendritic cells, and T cells for control of both infectious and autoimmune diseases.  These studies are carried out using molecular and cell biology, genomics, metabolomics, and animal models of disease.

The group encompasses a renowned medical research team comprised of academic and clinical staff, Honours and postgraduate PhD students. The group has formed strong national and international collaborative links with Monash University, University of Rochester, National Institutes of Health and CSIRO.

The Research

The Research

The Team

The Team

Key publications

Key Publications